spozbo
humansofnewyork:

"I went to a rural high school in Pennsylvania. Nobody from my town had gone to an Ivy League school in 20 years. So when I got accepted to MIT, I had this feeling of being so far behind everyone else. I chose to major in Chemistry, because I felt that was my best chance of keeping up. Don’t get me wrong, I love Chemistry, but I think I’d have been a great doctor."

humansofnewyork:

"I went to a rural high school in Pennsylvania. Nobody from my town had gone to an Ivy League school in 20 years. So when I got accepted to MIT, I had this feeling of being so far behind everyone else. I chose to major in Chemistry, because I felt that was my best chance of keeping up. Don’t get me wrong, I love Chemistry, but I think I’d have been a great doctor."

ryanpanos:

San Francisco’s Salt Flat | Charles Benton | Via

The southern end of the San Francisco Bay Area is known for expensive real estate, tech companies, and aerospace engineers. Less well known is its salt content.

Yet the salt industry has been a vital part of the South Bay for more than a century. Fly into any of the region’s airports and evidence of this appears as a vibrant quilt of briny pools in acid green, ochre, and shades of red that look toxic. These algae-infused intake and evaporation ponds, crisscrossed by channels and levees, are a surreal landscape seen best from the air.

Photographer Cris Benton has studied and documented this fascinating area for over 10 years, using cameras held aloft by large handmade kites. In his new book, Saltscapes: The Kite Aerial Photography of Cris Benton (Heyday Press), the retired architecture professor explains that kite aerial photography “fuels my fascination with photography’s capacity to reveal patterns and phenomena that lie beyond the capacities of our native senses.”

ryanpanos:

Oscar Newman’s Underground City Beneath Manhattan via socks-studio
The architect and city planner Oscar Newman, better known for his dreadful “Defensible space theory“, (pdf here) also fostered in 1969 the bizarre possibility of clearing out, with nuclear explosions, a massive underground sphere beneath Manhattan. The hollowed space would be then occupied by just a half of the volume with a regular city with a grid of streets and buildings, several levels of further undeground spaces and giant “air filters” reaching the surface.

Who’s to say this doesn’t already exist? 

ryanpanos:

Oscar Newman’s Underground City Beneath Manhattan via socks-studio

The architect and city planner Oscar Newman, better known for his dreadful “Defensible space theory“, (pdf here) also fostered in 1969 the bizarre possibility of clearing out, with nuclear explosions, a massive underground sphere beneath Manhattan. The hollowed space would be then occupied by just a half of the volume with a regular city with a grid of streets and buildings, several levels of further undeground spaces and giant “air filters” reaching the surface.

Who’s to say this doesn’t already exist? 

humansofnewyork:

Humans of New York

they are the most best humans to ever get tossed
in the cauldron
the long ladle of the tall witch
stirring and stirring
scraping it off the bottom
a handful of magic here
a pinch of the miraculous here
in the concrete world of right angles
the humans of new york
dream and chase the dream
they are the carrot 
and they are the stick
and they are spell bound for heights
they are here
because they have flavor
and they are being moved by magic no one sees
but every one knows
each and all of them
are a distinct flavor
in how beautiful it is to be
a star
in the human universe
of new york magic

humansofnewyork:

Humans of New York

they are the most best humans to ever get tossed
in the cauldron
the long ladle of the tall witch
stirring and stirring
scraping it off the bottom
a handful of magic here
a pinch of the miraculous here
in the concrete world of right angles
the humans of new york
dream and chase the dream
they are the carrot
and they are the stick
and they are spell bound for heights
they are here
because they have flavor
and they are being moved by magic no one sees
but every one knows
each and all of them
are a distinct flavor
in how beautiful it is to be
a star
in the human universe
of new york magic

wrzelewo:

This is my high school senior project. It’s my first experiment with radio and sound as storytelling mediums, and definitely a work in progress.

Best radio drama I’ve heard in a good while

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been off cocaine for about 4 months now.""What changed that allowed you to quit?""My parents stepped in and started randomly drug testing me.""Did you resent them at the time?""No. I only resented that they had to do it for me, because I couldn’t do it myself."

This one made me cry a little in the subway line

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been off cocaine for about 4 months now."
"What changed that allowed you to quit?"
"My parents stepped in and started randomly drug testing me."
"Did you resent them at the time?"
"No. I only resented that they had to do it for me, because I couldn’t do it myself."

This one made me cry a little in the subway line

cauxcollective:

Caux Collective Redirects: IBM Billboards

Through their ‘Smarter Cities’ project, American technology company IBM have sought to create innovative solutions to common problems, with the hope of improving the standard of every day living in cities, helping their residents become ‘smarter’. In order to spark the creative process into action, IBM turned to communications and advertising specialists Ogilvy to produce a set of outdoor advertising with a purpose.

If you’d like to read more head over to Inspirez, where you can find this post in it’s entirety, including additional images and further links.

Good example of meeting a need (with style), using advertising dollars, then allowing that deliverable (namely, the story of the event) to distribute itself via the Internet, with the brand as the hero of the story.

April 25: two by Brautigan

hopeinspoons:

Xerox Candy Bar

  Ah,
you’re just a copy
of all the candy bars
I’ve ever eaten.


The Shenevertakesherwatchoff Poem

for Marcia

Because you always have a clock
strapped to your body, it’s natural
that I should think of you as the
  correct time:
with your long blond hair at 8:03,
and your pulse-lightning breasts at
11:17, and your rose-meow smile at 5:30,
   I know I’m right.

Richard Brautigan